Heat wave, financial burden-economic policy

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Increasing heat waves due to the effects of global warming entail great human costs of killing thousands, but panicking thermometers also affects the economy as a whole.

According to the World Meteorological Organization, 9% of the approximately 2 million deaths caused by meteorological disasters worldwide between 1970 and 2019 caused extreme temperatures, according to the World Meteorological Organization. The proportion has increased significantly recently, with almost half of the 185,000 deaths in the last decade.

Also, according to the European Environment Agency (EEA), heat waves account for about 90% of the mortality rates associated with meteorological disasters from 1980 to 2020 in Europe.

During floods and storms, insurers start working quickly to quantify the damage already clearly visible on television, but more difficult for the most frequently evaluated heat waves under the mortality prism. ..

However, they not only represent economic costs in terms of lost lives, pressure on the health system, but also reduce worker productivity due to heat and agricultural impacts.

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There are few overall estimates for this issue.

However, the EEA was between 1980 and 2000. Heat waves cost € 27-70 billion in 32 European countries..

Less years of life

Noting that the effects of heat waves are rarely considered from an economic point of view, the national public health agency France has taken up this “underestimated and almost invisible social burden”.

According to a survey released in 2021, the heat wave from 2015 to 2020 will cost € 22-37 billion in France due to death, medical costs and loss of welfare, with the largest share being “early death”. Due to “intangible costs associated with”. “.

Reduced productivity

Heat also reduces the productivity of quantified workers.

Therefore, according to a study published in the journal, significant heat waves in 2003, 2010, 2015 and 2018 in Europe caused damage estimated to be about 0.3-0.5% of Europe’s GDP and in certain southern regions. There was a peak of over 2% of GDP. Nature in 2021.

And if measures are not taken to limit warming and improve adaptation to the impact, this impact could be nearly five times higher by 2060 compared to 1981-2010. The study warns.

According to the International Labor Organization (ILO), at 33-34 ° C, the average worker “loses 50% of the workforce.” In 2030, heat could reduce total working hours around the world by 2.2%, which is equivalent to 80 million full-time jobs. And at an estimated cost of $ 2.4 trillion in 2030, compared to $ 280 billion in 1995.

Reduced productivity affects outdoor workers, farmers, or construction workers in particular.

“Climate change-related thermal stress reduces global outdoor work capacity,” the United Nations Climate Expert (IPCC) claims, with 200-250 days of outdoor work in some areas by the end of the century. Estimated to be lost.

Drought and agriculture

Agriculture is, of course, climate sensitive, so heat waves and droughts are major threats to food.

Drought has a direct impact on crops. And while short-term high fever alone does not always cause great damage, it can enhance soil dryness, as it does in France today.

According to the French Ministry of Agriculture, the heat wave in France in 2019 reduced corn yields by 9% and wheat by about 10% compared to the five-year average. As another example, in the United States, the 2012 heat wave reduced corn production by 13% and increased prices around the world.

Heat waves also reduce dairy cow production and therefore milk supply. The IPCC also looks at the effects of heat stress on general livestock mortality and productivity.

According to the World Meteorological Organization, 9% of the approximately 2 million deaths from meteorological disasters worldwide between 1970 and 2019 caused extreme temperatures, according to the World Meteorological Organization. Percentages have increased significantly recently, with nearly half of the 185,000 deaths being heat waves in Europe, with about 90% of meteorological disaster-related mortality rates between 1980 and 2020, according to the European Environment Agency (EEA). It is occupied by waves. The damage already clearly visible on television is more difficult for the heat waves most often assessed under the mortality prism, but they are also economical in terms of lost lives, pressure on the health system. Representing costs, but also reducing productivity, EEA is a global estimate of this problem for workers due to heat and agricultural impacts, but the EEA was in 32 European countries between 1980 and 2000. It is estimated to cost 27 to 70 billion euros. France bears this “underestimated and almost invisible social burden”. According to a study released in 2021, the heat wave from 2015 to 2020 caused France to suffer € 22-37 billion in deaths, health care costs and health losses. The largest share comes from “intangible costs associated with premature death.” Heat also reduces worker productivity. This is quantified. 2003, 2010, 2015 and 2018 in Europe caused damage estimated to be about 0.3-0.5% of Europe’s GDP, peaking in some southern regions, according to a study published in Nature in 2021. More than 2% of GDP, this impact is almost five times higher by 2060 than from 1981 to 2010 if measures are not taken to limit warming and improve impact adaptation. The study warns that. To the International Labor Organization (ILO). In 2030, heat could reduce total working hours around the world by 2.2%, which is equivalent to 80 million full-time jobs. And at an estimated cost of $ 2.4 billion in 2030, compared to 280 billion in 1995. Loss of productivity affects outdoor workers, farmers, or construction workers in particular. “The United Nations Climate Expert (IPCC) claims that certain areas estimate that 200 to 250 days of outdoor work will be lost by the end of this century. Agriculture is, of course, climate-sensitive, which is why. Heat waves and droughts are a major threat to food Droughts have a direct impact on crops, and short-term high heat alone does not always cause great damage, but as in France today, the soil France’s 2019 heat wave is 9% for corn and about 10% for wheat, compared to a five-year average, as another example. In the United States, the 2012 heat wave reduced corn production by 13% and raised prices around the world. The heat wave reduced dairy production and therefore milk supply. The IPCC is also focusing on the effects of heat stress on general livestock mortality and productivity.

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